Short Sale Info

Short Sale Info


WHAT IS A SHORT SALE?

From the Seller’s Perspective:

A Short Sale, also known as a pre-foreclosure sale, is when you sell your home for less than the balance remaining on your mortgage. If your mortgage company agrees to a Short Sale, you can sell your home and pay off all (or a portion of) your mortgage balance with the proceeds. Fannie Mae’s program is called Short Sale/HAFA II.

A Short Sale is an alternative to foreclosure and may be an option if:

You are ineligible to refinance or modify your mortgage
You are facing a long-term hardship
You are behind on your mortgage payments
You owe more on your home than it’s worth
You have not been able to sell your home at a price that covers what you still owe on your mortgage
You can no longer afford your home and are ready or need to leave

From the Buyer’s Perspective:

Selling a home for less than the amount the current owner owes the mortgage company is called a short sale.

Buying a home that is a short sale is different from buying a property that is actually owned by the bank, known as an REO, or real-estate owned property, or a property that is in foreclosure.

All of this information is only understood by few people, but it’s lingo that anyone shopping for a home needs to understand to navigate today’s marketplace.

A short sale can be a good deal for a buyer, and it can help the seller avoid having a full foreclosure on his or her credit record. Although a short sale and a foreclosure negatively affect a seller’s credit score, in a short sale the damage can be minimized if the homeowner can persuade the lender to report the debt to credit bureaus as “paid in full.”

In a short sale, the proceeds from the transaction are less than the amount the seller needs to pay the mortgage debt and the costs of selling. For this deal to close, everyone who is owed money must agree to take less — or possibly no money at all. That makes short sales complex transactions that move slowly and often fall through.

A recently announced extension of the government’s housing rescue plan could make it easier to buy short-sale properties. The new version of the Making Home Affordable plan will pay lenders up to $1,000 if they allow a short sale of a property when the owners don’t qualify for loan modification because they owe too much money on the home. The program will spell out a short-sale process and provide standard documents, the U.S. Treasury says.

The government’s plan probably still won’t help if there are multiple liens on the property, but it should encourage lenders holding the first mortgage to move the process along.

Making Home Affordable
Short Sale vs. Foreclosure